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git pull --rebase : Making life easy

Github is confusing according to me and max developers find it too. So this is my latest post on using the git pull --rebase. This latest post on this topic because this git command will make your life easy, different and amazing.

Let's rock onto that.


When working on a project we synchronize the code by using the git pull command (common for everyone).

The git pull command actually issues git fetch and git merge commands, which will result with some extra damnn commits and ugly merges in the commit log.

So here is the final solution for this.

You can simply use the command git pull --rebase to keep your repository clean. Your commit log and everything will be clean.



Must Know

If you wanna merge a quality branch it might be cleverish to actually merge your commits so, by having a single point of integration of two distinct branches. Now the conflict resolving will as per the commit basis, so you have to use the command git rebase --continue to get to the next group of conflicts.


Thanks For Reading 😀

I don't encourage this practice for ..... (you know what) use for personal projects only.

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